Top 10 Sights in Turin

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Mole Antonelliana
Mole Antonelliana

A landmark building of Turin since 1889, it was purchased by the municipality who decided to make it a monument to Italian unification. Standing at a height of 167.5m, at the time of its construction it was the highest brick building in Europe. Built in an eclectic style, the Mole has a squat square base topped by a large dome with a spire. You can ascend to the panoramic observation platform either by elevator or on foot by climbing its 573 steps. Since 2000, it has hosted the National Museum of Cinema. 

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Museo Egizio
Museo Egizio

Founded in 1824, Turin’s Egyptian Museum is the oldest Egyptian museum in the world and the second in terms of the value and quality of its treasures outside of Cairo. In 2006, during Turin’s Winter Olympics, the museum was re-modelled by Oscar-winning set designer Dante Ferretti. It houses more than 37,000 artifacts, from the Paleolithic to the Coptic era. The archaeologist and Egyptologist Jean-François Champollion once said, ‘The road to Memphis and Thebes passes through Turin’. 

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Musei Reali
Musei Reali

The residence of the Savoys until 1865, it is now owned by the Italian government. The museum tour comprises a 3km route spread over 30,000 sq.m. and 7 hectares of Royal Gardens. In 1563, Duke Emanuele Filiberto of Savoy moved the capital of the duchy from Chambéry to Turin, marking the beginning of a major urban transformation and the enrichment of the dynastic collections, which now include artifacts from the prehistoric era to the present time. 

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Palazzo Madama
Palazzo Madama

Situated in the centre of Piazza Castello, it has always been a reference point in the city, from Roman times to 1848, when it became the headquarters of the first Subalpine Senate. Its name refers to ‘Madame Royale’ Christine of France, who took up residence here in 1600. The view of the city from the Panoramic Tower is spectacular. 

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Teatro Regio
Teatro Regio

The Regio is one of the most important Italian theatres on the European scene, offering an action-packed program of opera and ballet. It was designed by Filippo Juvarra and inaugurated in 1740. Destroyed by a fire in 1936, and rebuilt in 1973 by Turinese architect Carlo Mollino, the only part of the original building that still remains is its façade, now a UNESCO World Heritage site. Its unusual gate, named ‘Odissea Musicale’ (Musical Odyssey), is by Umberto Mastroianni. 

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Piazza San Carlo
Piazza San Carlo

Also known as ‘the drawing room’ of the city, it was commissioned by Marie Christine of France in true Parisian style with seemingly endless porticoes housing fashion boutiques, and an equestrian statue - the ‘Caval d’Brons’ – of Duke Emanuele Filiberto of Savoy at its centre. 

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Lingotto
Lingotto

This complex of buildings built in 1916, based on a project by Matté Trucco to house the FIAT factory (now FCA), still symbolizes the wealth of the city. Reconverted by Renzo Piano in the 1980s, it hosts events and the famous rooftop test track. The old Carpano plants, lying adjacent to the Lingotto complex, are now occupied by ‘Eataly’s’ vast food market. 

8 / 10
Museo Nazionale Dell'Automobile
Museo Nazionale dell'Automobile

The Car Museum (MAUTO) was opened in 1960 and is one of the oldest car museums in the world. The semi-circular building overlooking the River Po acts as a prelude to the three floors of the collection featuring a spectacular layout designed by François Confinio, who also designed the exhibition space of the Museum of Cinema. 

9 / 10
Allianz Juventus Stadium
Allianz Juventus Stadium

Designed to host up to 41,507 spectators, this is the sixth largest stadium in Italy. It is owned by the Juventus Football Club whose home matches have been played here since 2011. An architectural symbol, it is one of the most avant-garde facilities in the world. The J-Museum, the official football museum of the ‘bianconero’ team is hosted inside the stadium. 

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Villa della Regina
Villa della Regina

The summer country residence of the House of Savoy, it was built at the beginning of the 17th century as a court vineyard. It became known as Villa della Regina (literally the Queen’s Villa) when King Vittorio Amedeo II gifted it to his future bride in 1714. Don’t miss a visit to this magnificent residence, distinguished by the remains of its original 18th century decorations and furnishings, and its Italianate gardens. Villa della Regina is a part of the circuit of the Royal Residences of Turin and Piedmont, a UNESCO World Heritage site.

By WhereTraveler Staff

The first capital of Italy is a ‘drawing room city’ of elegant porticoes surrounded by green hills and, further afield, by majestic mountains. This is Turin, a city renowned for its history, culture and natural beauties.

For more detailed info, please visit www.whereitalia.com/turin