How to Go Solo in St. Louis

The best places to go in St. Louis when you're a party of one

If you're traveling solo. that's not necessarily a bad thing, particularly if you patronize the following places in St. Louis, where going it alone can open up new opportunities. So be brave, go solo, you might make a friend or two.

Repertory Theatre of St. Louis

When you're trying to get tickets to any of The Rep's season of mainstage, box-office hits ("Follies," "Until the Flood," "A Christmas Carol," "All My Sons," "To Kill a Mockinbird," "Million Dollar Quartet"), it's always easier to find a single seat than it is to find two together, although any seat in this intimate, thrust-stage theater is great. The seating is even more flexible for the season of smaller productions in the Studio Theatre series, including "Mothers and Sons," "Constellations" and "The Royale."

 

Repertory Theatre of St. Louis' production of "Follies"

Ballpark Village

There's no better opportunity to blend into the crowd than during a major sporting event (think Stanley Cup, Final Four, MLB opening day) at Ballpark Village, the dining/entertainment complex next to Busch Stadium that packs them in to watch big games on the giant, super-sharp video screen. They also produce a slew of special events, concerts, etc., so you can rest assured there's always something going on. Plus, you've got lots of dining options (Budweiser Brew House, Drunken Fish, Cardinals Nation, El Birdos Cantina and more) and the Cardinals Hall of Fame and Museum.

Ballpark Village

Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis

You don't have to be Catholic to marvel at the largest collection of mosaics under one roof in the world; Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis welcomes visitors of all faiths to find inspiration in one of the most spectacular interior spaces in the city. Come, gaze up and contemplate the ineffable in a structure that re-establishes the meaning of "awesome."

Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis

Saint Louis Art Museum

It's always nice to share a museum-going experience, but going solo has its advantages, like not worrying about how long you're lingering among the pre-Columbian artifacts or the 20th century German art or the masterpieces of early American art, all specialties at the Saint Louis Art Museum, the city's principal visual-arts institution. Spend as much time as you like in front of Monet's "Water Lilies," George Caleb Bingham's "The County Election," or the room full of masterpieces by Max Beckmann. You can even peruse the new outdoor sculpture garden at your own pace, paying special attention to the way the layout engages both the severe geometry of the adjacent East Building and the random edges of the surrounding woods.

Saint Louis Art Museum

Lucas Park Grille

There's almost always room at the bar at Lucas Park Grille, the tony restaurant on Washington Ave. that delivers ambitious New American cuisine on large and small plates in a stylish yet casual atmosphere in a renovated, 8,000-square-foot space that includes enough TV monitors to keep you in the game.

Lucas Park Grille

City Museum

Let your inner child loose at this indoor-outdoor fun house, a deservedly famous St. Louis attraction that features a fantasy forest, a ferris wheel on the roof and a mind-boggling outdoor play space featuring two abandoned airplanes perched on precarious-looking structures linked by a series of metal-ribbed tunnels like a hamster maze writ large. It's one delirious, jaw-dropping experience after another, and it's the one place you're sure to tell your friends back home about. You're here alone; nobody knows you; just go nuts.

City Museum

Missouri History Museum

One of the city's best museums will start you on your exploration of St. Louis in grand style, but the museum also features artifacts from that famous non-St. Louisan, Charles Lindbergh, who made the first solo flight from New York to Paris in 1927. The Lindbergh Collection The Lindbergh Collection features the gifts and trophies presented to Lindbergh after his many flights in the Spirit of St. Louis as well as medals of honor, luxurious manufactured goods, handmade tokens of appreciation from civilians, photographs and Lindbergh's papers through the early 1940s. A replica of his airplane, the Spirit of St. Louis (named in honor of his St. Louis financial backers) hangs in the museum atrium, inspiring solo adventures of every stripe.

David Lancaster
About the author

David Lancaster is an accomplished artist and photographer whose work has been shown in galleries in St. Louis, Chica...