A Closer Look at San Antonio's Spanish Revival Architecture

Marrying elements of Spanish Colonial architecture into modern aesthetics, San Antonio pays tribute to its ancestral heritage.

When it was built in 1744, San Antonio's most famous structure—The Alamo—reflected the functionality of a Spanish mission in addition to architectural details common in the Spanish Colonial style. In addition to it and the Mission Revival style there's Churrigueresque, a Spanish Baroque-type of architecture known for elements such as sculptural work, intricuately decorated facades and geometric tiling indicative of Moorish architectural aesthetic.

By taking a closer look at these ornate details found in structures such as the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, Southwestern Bell Building and Thomas Jefferson High School, it becomes even more apparent how much history is held within the brick-and-mortar bones of the Alamo City.

SLIDESHOW: SPANISH REVIVAL ARCHITECTURE

(All photos: ©Isaac Arjonilla)

Jaimie Siegle
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