The 7 Hottest Establishments at Waikiki’s New Dining Destination

Sample everything from burgers and flatbreads to salads and pasta.

First, it was Yokocho. Then came The Street. Now it’s ABC Stores’ Dukes Lane Market & Eatery, which is the latest Waikiki dining destination to offer fast-casual and upscale options under one roof.

“It’s modeled after Eataly in New York City,” said ABC Stores’ corporate chef Keith Steel Kong. “It’s Dean & Deluca, Whole Foods and a restaurant all in one. We’ve got it all covered—from sunrise to sunset.”

In other words, at the market and eatery, guests can grab a bacon sandwich on an artisanal bun for breakfast, a rotisserie chicken plate lunch or beefy burger for lunch and enjoy a full-service dinner in the evening.


Kona kampachi

Basalt

This is Dukes’ crowning jewel, a 150-seat, full-service contemporary restaurant that also offers al fresco dining.

In celebration of Dukes Lane Market & Eatery, Kong has revamped the menu to put his own culinary signature stamp, citing staff members as "the inspiration for the new menu." "It's a collaborative effort," said Kong during media sneak preview. "It took all our efforts to come up with these new dishes." Among this is a spicy kampachi poke, cleverly served with atop a shrimp chip and complemented with a slightly fiery homemade sambal. 

While he would like to take credit for developing his rotisserie duck empanada, Kong admitted that it was his Peruvian native son-in-law who helped him compose the recipe, which includes aged goat cheese, brandied cherries, pickled jalapeno and avocado lime crema. "No, I don't stand in the kitchen trying to mix all of these different flavor profiles," quipped Kong, gesturing with his hands as if he was concocting some magical elxir. "Some flavors work better together and these ones work."

Kong's riff on the classic Italina risotto includes edamame, bok choy, baby carrots, fennel pollen and a Parmesan crisp for an Old World touch. The silky consistency and Asian touch stand up to any traditional risotto. So does his lobster bisques, which is prepared in multiple layers to achieve a deep and rich texture. And while macadamia-nut-crusted island fish may seem so '90s, this one here is worth a try. Monchong substitutes for the classic mahimahi, and the beurre blanc sauce is replaced by a tarty calamansi-and-caper butter. A sure winner is the 24-hour sous-vide braised pork shoulder that's accompanied by a robust IPA mustard  jus and sauce verte. 


Rotisserie chicken

Spitfire Rotisserie & Flatbread Pizzas

It’s no longer necessary to go to Chinatown if one is craving some Peking duck in half and whole orders. Or try one of the plate lunches, which offers a choice of duck, Kona-Coffee-rubbed chicken and the Filipino-style barbecue pork known as tocino. Choose two from this list of sides: local greens, mac salad, kimchi cucumbers, green papaya slaw, and white, brown or garlic rice.

On the flatbread pizza side, options include the Hawaiian, garnished with smoked pork belly, candied pineapples and chicharones—crunchy pork rinds—; Margherita, topped with fresh mozzarella, local oregano and basil; Sausage, prepared with Filipino sausage, malunggay leaves pesto, grilled onions, shiitake mushrooms, bacon and fried garlic; and Meatless, made with grilled eggplant, squash, wild mushrooms, charred tomatoes, onion relish and kale.


Hamburger on a bun

Ono’s Burger Bar

Every food hall almost demands a burger joint. This one here is called “Ono,” which translates to delicious. A riff on the In-N-Out burger, the signature I.N.O. consists of a 4-ounce patty topped with cheese, sweet onions, tomatoes and lettuce, all sandwiched between a sweet brioche bun. Add some pork belly and a sunny-side-up egg for the ultimate “loco moco-wich.” And be sure to order a side of fries seasoned with garlic and togarashi—chili pepper—or, better yet, the “buttah tots,” butter-loaded mashed potatoes enveloped in a crispy shell. Other types of available burgers include the Makaweli Ranch lamb, katsu beef, tonkatsu pork, mahi mahi, teriyaki prime rib and, for vegetarians, the black bean burger comes in a charcoal-grilled brioche bun.


Cup of coffee

Island Gourmet Coffee

This is the go-to place for a hot cup of Kona Coffee or refreshing Teapresso and a quick bacon sandwich, blueberry scone or breakfast bun before heading to the beach. You’ll also find the Filipino version of a Cubano, a fresh baguette layered with tocino and ham, then slathered with stone-ground mustard.


Doughnuts

Bakery

Come here early—before noon for sure—if you want to try one of the donuts. Executive pastry chef Mayumi Yamamoto and her team deep fry fresh batches of dough at 6, 7 and 8 in the morning, tempting passers-by with a malasada doughnut on Mondays and Thursdays; Old Fashioned donuts on Tuesdays, Fridays and Sundays; and buttery mochi on Wednesday and Saturdays.


Market

Market

This is the part of the concept that is perhaps most familiar among residents and tourists alike. In addition to the traditional sundries, guests can choose from a variety of locally grown produce, on-premise baked goods and made-in-Hawaii goods. If youʻre hungry and in a hurry, check out Dash Fast & Fresh. A selection of gourmet sandwiches—made with the Bakery’s breads—and healthy salads will quiet those growling stomachs.


Selection of wines

Vault

It’s safe to say that the Vault is the keeper of fine wines, Champagne and craft beers. Pleasantly surprising, however, are the prices, which aren’t considerably marked up because of the Waikiki location. A bottle of Prosecco, for example, is about the same of what you would pay at a local grocery store. The same holds true for the various wines. Dukes Lane Market & Eatery Hyatt Centric, 2255 Kuhio Ave., 808.923.5689

Simplicio Paragas
About the author

Simplicio serves as the Hawaii senior editor for Wh...